Michigan State University operates the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) as a user facility for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC),

UK-funded FAUST Project to Enable New Experiments at FRIB at MSU

The University of Surrey in England published an article (“£3m Surrey sensors will shine new light on why stars explode”) that discusses how the United Kingdom Research and Innovation (UKRI) Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) is funding the FRIB Accelerated-beams for Understanding Science and Technology (FAUST) instrument, which will enable new experiments at FRIB. This investment benefits FRIB and its user community. The UK team visited FRIB 16-18 January and planning is underway.

Michigan State University operates the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) as a user facility for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC), supporting the mission of the DOE-SC Office of Nuclear Physics and a global user community of 1,800 scientists.

From the University of Surrey article: “Almost all chemical elements like gold, oxygen, and iron are produced by nuclear reactions in stars. To learn more about where they come from, scientists need a deeper understanding of how these reactions take place.

“Scientists will smash beams of speedy rare isotopes into various forms of plastic targets. By measuring the emerging light-charged particles (such as protons) that are produced, they hope to learn about the origins of elements from gold to oxygen and beyond.

“The particles will be measured by a combination of silicon detectors, supplied by West Sussex-based Micron Semiconductor Ltd., and caesium iodide crystals, developed by colleagues at the University of York.”

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